Monday, 16 September 2019 Sydney
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Invest In Australia News::

  • Tasmania’s Biosecurity Advisory Committee seeks members

    The Hodgman majority Liberal Government is committed to strengthening Tasmania’s biosecurity systems to protect our primary industries, environment, community and the tourism sector.

    Tasmania’s reputation as a premium producer of agricultural and seafood products, and as a leading tourism destination, is reliant on a rigorous and effective biosecurity system.

    Tasmania’s new landmark Biosecurity Act (2019), replaces seven current Acts with a single streamlined modern statute that is “fit-for-purpose”.

  • Labor’s reheated leftovers from economic hangover

    Labor’s reheating of the former, failed Economic Development Minister, David O’Byrne, as Shadow Treasurer demonstrates just how out of touch they remain on Tasmania’s economy.

    Tasmanians will not forget that under David O’Byrne’s economic stewardship 10,000 Tasmanians lost their job, our state was driven into recession, and people were fleeing for the mainland.

    David O’Byrne cannot be believed until he commits to producing an alternative budget each and every year.

  • Proposal to authorise Virgin Australia to cooperate with Virgin Atlantic

    The ACCC has issued a draft determination proposing to authorise Virgin Australia (ASX: VAH) to more closely cooperate with Virgin Atlantic on flights between Australia and the UK and Ireland, via Hong Kong, Los Angeles and any other future mutual connecting points.

    “Virgin Australia and Virgin Atlantic have asked to be authorised to cooperate more closely to improve their services between Australia and the UK and Ireland and attract more passengers,” ACCC Commissioner Stephen Ridgeway said.

  • Banks assume role of moral compass for legitimate businesses

    The Australian Small Business and Family Enterprise Ombudsman, Kate Carnell says banks are wrong to discriminate against legitimate small businesses in the adult industry by blocking their access to essential financial services.

    “My office is continuously contacted by sex workers who have complained they have been denied banking services such as merchant facilities to allow them to conduct their business,” Ms Carnell says.

    “This is an ongoing issue and we have expressed our concerns to the Australian Banking Association and individual banks involved.

  • SME innovation under threat as patent regime faces the axe: Ombudsman

    The Australian Small Business and Family Enterprise Ombudsman, Kate Carnell has urged the federal government not to abolish the low-cost innovation patent regime, saying this would create a significant barrier to small businesses.

    “It would be a mistake to phase out the innovation patent system without any replacement,” Ms Carnell said.

    “Although we acknowledge the current system is not perfect, it’s the only viable way for SMEs to access temporary or short-term IP protections, which is essential, particularly when disputes arise.

  • Elders and AIRR rural services deal not opposed

    The ACCC will not oppose the proposed acquisition of rural wholesale buying group Australian Independent Rural Retailers (AIRR) by Elders (ASX: ELD). 

    Elders is an important competitor in rural retailing, but currently has minimal operations in wholesaling to independent rural retail stores. AIRR is an important wholesaler to independent rural stores, but has minimal assets of its own in rural retailing.

  • Mining rich vein of Tasmanian investment

    There is no stronger or more consistent supporter of the mining and minerals sector than the Hodgman majority Liberal Government and we are committed to grow the industry.

    We are delivering on our Mining for Tasmania’s Future Policy, which is providing the right settings to encourage investment and ensure the mining and minerals sector remains an economic cornerstone of Tasmania.

    This is a sector that provides more than 55 per cent of Tasmania’s commercial exports, and employs more than 5,600 jobs, many in regional communities.

  • Labor’s big guns abandon White

    Labor Members of Parliament this afternoon sought to distance themselves from the disastrous leadership of Rebecca White, declining the opportunity to vote on a motion to back their leader.

    Despite having ample opportunity to stand up and defend Rebecca White’s ailing leadership during a private Member's motion, not one senior member of her Shadow Ministry spoke in her defence.

    Nor did David or Michelle O’Byrne enter the House of Assembly to defend Rebecca White or show solidarity.

  • Morrison Government’s health funding helping Tasmanians

    The Morrison Government is boosting funding for Tasmanian healthcare, with a $91.9 million Tasmanian Health Plan that addresses healthcare needs and provides affordable and accessible healthcare, and an additional $25.6 million for the North and North-West*.

    The facts are:

  • Tasmania shines at AHA National Awards

    Tasmania’s world-class visitor experiences have again been recognised at the Australian Hotels Association National Awards for Excellence, held on the Gold Coast this evening.

    Congratulations to the Shoreline Hotel, on winning the Regional Overall Hotel of the Year award, as well as Best Bistro-Metropolitan.

    The recently opened Maylands Lodge in New Town was awarded Best Superior Accommodation and Furneaux Restaurant in St Helens was recognised as Best Restaurant – Regional.

  • SME innovation under threat as patent regime faces the axe: Ombudsman

    The Australian Small Business and Family Enterprise Ombudsman, Kate Carnell has urged the federal government not to abolish the low-cost innovation patent regime, saying this would create a significant barrier to small businesses.

    “It would be a mistake to phase out the innovation patent system without any replacement,” Ms Carnell said.

    “Although we acknowledge the current system is not perfect, it’s the only viable way for SMEs to access temporary or short-term IP protections, which is essential, particularly when disputes arise.

  • Telco provider BVivid pays penalties and will release consumers from contracts

    The ACCC has accepted a court-enforceable undertaking from telco provider BVivid Pty Ltd (BVivid) for making telemarketing calls to consumers in areas transitioning to the NBN that BVivid has admitted likely breached the Australian Consumer Law (ACL).

    BVivid also paid $25,200 in penalties after the ACCC issued it with two infringement notices.

    From October 2017 to at least May 2018, BVivid cold-called consumers and told them their internet services would be disconnected or they would lose their telephone number if they did not move to the NBN immediately.

  • LG to pay $160,000 for misleading representations to two consumers

    The Federal Court has imposed $160,000 in penalties on LG Electronics Australia Pty Ltd (LG) for making misleading representations to two consumers about their consumer guarantee rights.

    In June 2018, the Full Federal Court partially upheld an appeal by the ACCC against an earlier judgment dismissing the ACCC’s case.

    The Full Court found that LG made misleading representations to two consumers who believed they had purchased faulty televisions, when it implied on phone calls they had no rights other than those under LG’s manufacturer’s warranties.

  • Cartel immunity policy strengthened, whistleblowing tool launched

    The ACCC has strengthened its cartel immunity and cooperation policy to enhance its transparency and clarify its scope.

    The updated immunity policy, which has been informed by experience gathered during key criminal investigations, will come into effect on 1 October 2019.

  • New lending to households rises 3.9 per cent

    The value of new lending commitments to households rose 3.9 per cent in July 2019, seasonally adjusted, according to the latest Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) figures on new lending to households and businesses.

    The rise in new lending to households in July follows a 1.9 per cent rise in June 2019.

    ABS Chief Economist, Bruce Hockman said: “In July, growth in new lending commitments to households was the strongest since October 2014.”

  • Delivering for Tasmania’s forest industry

    The Hodgman majority Liberal Government has a mandate to drive business investment and create real jobs for Tasmanians, including rebuilding the forestry industry and supporting the 5,700+ people it employs.

    Our Strategic Growth Plan for Tasmania’s forests, fine timber and wood fibre industry provides a clear pathway to assist industry to grow, supporting forestry jobs.

    We are investing $500,000 to help build a stronger industry, by providing forestry contractors with skills and access to professional advice to take their businesses to the next level.

  • LG to pay $160,000 for misleading representations to two consumers

    The Federal Court has imposed $160,000 in penalties on LG Electronics Australia Pty Ltd (LG) for making misleading representations to two consumers about their consumer guarantee rights.

    In June 2018, the Full Federal Court partially upheld an appeal by the ACCC against an earlier judgment dismissing the ACCC’s case.

    The Full Court found that LG made misleading representations to two consumers who believed they had purchased faulty televisions, when it implied on phone calls they had no rights other than those under LG’s manufacturer’s warranties.

  • Cartel immunity policy strengthened, whistleblowing tool launched

    The ACCC has strengthened its cartel immunity and cooperation policy to enhance its transparency and clarify its scope.

    The updated immunity policy, which has been informed by experience gathered during key criminal investigations, will come into effect on 1 October 2019.

  • Ombudsman urges prospective franchisees to do their homework

    The Australian Small Business and Family Enterprise Ombudsman, Kate Carnell is urging prospective franchisees to do their homework before investing, after the ACCC found some franchisors were failing to provide adequate information to buyers.

    The regulator found one-in-three franchisors in the food services sector had failed to disclose useful contact details of former franchisees to allow prospective buyers to conduct due diligence.

  • Significant concerns with customer loyalty schemes

     

    Customer loyalty schemes, including frequent flyer, supermarket and credit card operators, must ensure they are not misleading consumers according to an ACCC draft report released today for comment.

    The ACCC’s Customer Loyalty Schemes draft report highlights a number of concerns:

  • ACCC opposes chilled ready meals deal

    The ACCC has decided to oppose the proposed acquisition of Jewel Fine Foods (Jewel) by B&J City Kitchen.

    B&J City Kitchen and Jewel (in administration) are the two largest manufacturers of chilled ready meals in Australia. Chilled ready meals are pre-cooked complete meals, which require little preparation by consumers before consumption and are sold through grocery retailers, petrol stations, convenience stores and food service operators, such as airlines.

  • Ombudsman seeks feedback on Business Funding Guide

    The Australian Small Business and Family Enterprise Ombudsman, Kate Carnell is seeking feedback on the ground-breaking Business Funding Guide.

    The guide, released in July by ASBFEO in partnership with Scottish Pacific Business Finance, is an industry-first publication primarily written for accountants, bookkeepers, brokers and other financial advisers, to help their small business clients find the right funding and get ‘finance fit’ to increase their likelihood of having funding applications approved.

  • Court finds Ashley & Martin contract terms unfair

    The Federal Court has found hair loss business Ashley & Martin’s terms in three standard form contracts with consumers are void because they were unfair.

    From June 2014 until at least June 2017, Ashley & Martin signed up more than 25,000 customers to its ‘Personal RealGROWTH Program’ using three different standard form contracts which have all been found to contain unfair terms.

  • Appeal on cartel conduct in the Mount Penny coal licence cartel case dismissed

    An ACCC appeal against a Federal Court judgment in relation to alleged bid rigging conduct involving Cascade Coal Pty Ltd (Cascade), Paul and Moses Obeid and others was dismissed today by the Full Federal Court.

    The appeal focused on whether parties associated with Obeid family members and Cascade were “in competition” at the time they withdrew a bid for Mount Penny and Glendon Brook mining exploration licences. The Full Federal Court has concluded there was no error of law on that issue.